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Senator Collins Announces Open Application Process for America’s Scenic Byways

Washington, D.C. — As a result of legislation authored by U.S. Senators Susan Collins (R-ME) and Ben Cardin (D-MD), the National Scenic Byways Program is once again accepting nominations for designation to America’s Byways.  Nominations must be completed and submitted by 11:59 P.M. ET on May 15, 2020.

Senators Collins and Cardin’s Reviving America’s Scenic Byways Act of 2019, which was signed into law last year, restarted the dormant designation process for the National Scenic Byways Program. This is a voluntary, community-based Federal Highway Administration program preserving and enhancing selected roads throughout the United States. The roads in Maine, Maryland, and across the country are recognized based on one or more archeological, cultural, historic, natural, recreational, and scenic qualities.

“Maine’s three National Scenic Byways, as well as the Acadia All-American Road, provide Mainers and tourists alike with spectacular views and memorable experiences.  These roadways also spur much-needed economic activity throughout our state,” said Senator Collins.  “I am pleased that, following our bipartisan effort, more local communities will be able to protect precious corridors and attract visitors by nominating bucolic routes through the National Scenic Byways program.”

Since its inception in 1991, the National Scenic Byways Program has officially recognized 150 roads around the country, but the last round of designations occurred in October 2009. Maine is currently home to the Acadia All-American Road as well as three National Scenic Byways: the Old Canada Road National Scenic Byway, the Rangeley Lakes National Scenic Byway, and Schoodic Scenic Byway.

National Scenic Byways have been shown to generate significant economic activity for nearby communities, many of which are small and rural in nature.

Click HERE for more information on how to nominate a scenic byway.

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All Information was gathered from publicly available US Government releases. "§105. Subject matter of copyright: United States Government works Copyright protection under this title is not available for any work of the United States Government, but the United States Government is not precluded from receiving and holding copyrights transferred to it by assignment, bequest, or otherwise. ( Pub. L. 94–553, title I, §101, Oct. 19, 1976, 90 Stat. 2546 .)" http://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?req=(title:17%20section:105%20edition:prelim)